Too big for our skies?

With Natural England and the RSPB carrying out yet more research, assessments and feasibility studies to see if a reintroduction of White-tailed (Sea) Eagles into Suffolk will have a detrimental impact on the livestock farming industry in the area, one would be forgiven for thinking they were readying themselves for a good old-fashioned western duel, not initiating a conservation project. The immortal threat of ‘this town ain’t big enough for the both of us’ permeates the attitude of the old-fashioned society that these conservation bodies are up against, generally intolerant of anything with a predatory disposition. Unfortunately for our birds of prey, far too many ‘conservationists’ fall into this club as well, intent solely on protecting pretty song birds and ground-nesting game birds.

It’s astonishing the number of people that I’ve met over the last year or more who all regurgitate the same line of ‘there’ll be nothing left’ when the topic of a White-tailed Eagle reintroduction comes up, as if the bird is some rabid tiger with huge pterodactyl wings. Yes, they are known to take lambs but there are measures that can be taken that don’t include poison or firearms. The birds, mammals and fish that we see around us in Britain today all survived the period when the eagle lived here naturally before we extirpated them, so what would be different if they were to be reintroduced? Or have our interests in self-preservation reached such levels that we honestly believe there is no space for any top predators other than ourselves?

But, with it being the International Year of Biodiversity, I shall try to remain optimistic. After all, Natural England does seem optimistic about starting formal consultation on the reintroduction issue in the second half of this year. Perhaps one day we will see this magnificent bird return to English skies. But for now, in defiance and celebration rather than pessimism and nostalgia, here’s a series of photographs from my last couple of visits to Scotland showing both wild and captive birds doing what White-tailed Eagles do best. Wouldn’t it be great to see this along England’s coast once again…

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